Week 3 share

In the share this week (sorry we slacked & there’s no pic): lettuce, mustard mix, kohlrabi, radishes or japanese turnips, garlic scapes, scallions, zucchini squashes, and kale/choy/koji/chard

What’s new on the farm.

It may be hard to believe, but we have not had a meaningful rain for a month. The farm is parched, and temperatures are ramping up. You’d think it was August the way the lawn is already burning out. Although we expect droughty stretches in summer, spring usually provides the farm with adequate rainfall. So, it seems odd to us that we have been irrigating around the clock. Like most vegetable soils, ours are coarse textured, which means they drain very well. That’s a benefit early in the season, because a well-drained soil warms sooner, and warm soils provide crop nutrients and good growth sooner than cool soils. But our coarse soils are working against us now – some crops are wilting, others are slowing down.

There is little cause for concern at the moment. So far, we are keeping up with our irrigation schedule. Although our back pond is already running low, our middle pond has deep reserves, and our well also appears to have ample water. We have two irrigation reels and miles of trickle irrigation lines to do the job, and most of it is fully functional (although a reel broke down last week, the parts needed to fix it arrived on Friday, and it should be working in the sweet corn by Monday morning). Moreover, the forecast for Monday is calling for afternoon showers. So, there’s room for optimism.

Working with water provided a cool respite from today’s heat. The middle pond is a world away from our manicured vegetable fields. Nestled at the base of a ravine and surrounded by dense woods, the pond is a cool, wild place. As I refueled the pump, I was in the company of tadpoles the size of marshmallows, snapping turtles and Great Blue Herons.

It will be a huge relief when rainfall comes, but with some effort we can fill these gaps between rains. Here’s a look at today’s irrigation activities. Back pond: we irrigated a field of leeks, a field of cabbages and collards and a block of small greenhouses containing peppers, tomatoes, ginger and basil. Middle pond: we irrigated a field of melons, cucumbers, eggplants and cutting flowers. Front well: we irrigated two blocks of cutting flowers, a broccoli field and a bank of small greenhouses containing flowers, more peppers and more tomatoes. If we water every day at this pace, we can irrigate the whole farm once a week.

Here’s hoping for rain. Cheers, Ted

p.s. It is now Tuesday. Monday’s rain never materialized, although heavy rains fell to the north and south of us. We have managed to repair our broken irrigation reel and have used it in the corn and in a newly seeded block. Rain is expected on the weekend. Cross your fingers!

Week 2 share

Another delicious delivery of farm-fresh vegetables arrived at the garden. As usual, lots of yummi greens. Did you know, you can make a pesto from just about any greens. Just chop it up finely, add some roasted pine nuts or sunflower seeds, oil, salt and pepper to taste.

CSAShareDelivery2-06142018

What’s new on the farm.

It’s Sunday. Nate is painting a piece of farm equipment he has built, Jan is working in her flower garden and the Medinas are harvesting strawberries.

I’ve just come in from planting green beans with the John Deere and Multiflex seeder I purchased last year. It’s become dry and my tractor kicked up a cloud of dust as it pulled the seeder along. I sprinkled black bacterial spores on the white bean seeds. Once the spores awaken from their slumber, they’ll colonize the bean roots and provide them with nitrogen they have “fixed” from the air. I’ll irrigate these tomorrow as part of a block that includes a new carrot seeding. Three 350’ beds of beans, each bed with two rows, or just over 2000 row-feet. I will repeat this every ten days or so through early August. It is part of a regular seeding I’ll do that includes radishes and greens.

On my way back to the barn, I peeked under the row cover where arugula, a salad mix and radishes have been growing for the past 30 days or so. All three of these will be in your shares this week. We’ll pull them root and all and then bunch and wash them. Bunched, we’ll be able to send them without a plastic bag. For your part, all you’ll have to do is cut them midway up the stem, rinse, dry, and serve.

The locusts finished blooming here a week ago. They grow in groves and produce a powerfully sweet fragrance. The wood is famous for long lived fences, but they are also valuable to farmers as an indicator plant: old timers will tell you that it’s safe to plant your garden once the locusts have bloomed. Last week, believing the threat of frost to be behind us, we planted sweet potato slips, the last of our field peppers, chiles and eggplants and uncovered our cucumbers and squashes.

Have a great week, Ted

Week 1 share

Small but mighty to start with, here’s what farmer Ted sent down for our first distribution of the season:

It’s not too late!

Although our enrollment deadline has officially passed, our farmers would love to bring more members into the fold. So please don’t hesitate to click on through and set yourself up for 22 weeks of the freshest veggies, fruit, eggs, and flower bouquets you’ll ever have the pleasure of bringing into your home!

Email us for enrollment info!

Jan our flower farmer, with an armload of larkspur!

 

The sign-up deadline is April 30th, just days away!

Sign up now! You'll get 22 weekly deliveries of fresh, local and organic produce.

We hope you’ll join us for the 2018 summer season. Our sign-up deadline is April 30th. Find out more and purchase a CSA share.

As a member of the CSA, you’ll get 22 weekly deliveries of fresh, organically grown herbs, greens and seasonal vegetables of all kinds from our farm in the upper Hudson Valley. You’ll get bicolor sweet corn, heirloom and red beefsteak tomatoes, colorful peppers, salad greens of every kind, cucumbers, carrots, red and yellow onions, broccoli, cabbage, potatoes, fresh green beans and much, much more.

You will get to eat ultra-fresh food and be exposed to new vegetables and new ways of cooking; you will get to visit the farm and develop a relationship with the farmers who grow your food; and you’ll learn more about how your food is grown. Perhaps best of all, you’ll get to be part of a community of Lower East Side neighbors with a common interest in food, health and sustainability.

Our distribution takes place each Thursday from June 7th to November 7th on the back patio of the M’Finda Kalunga Community Garden.

 

Successful meet & greet with our farmers; time to sign up for your share.

food display on table

We had the chance to taste some of the a la carte extras from Lewis Waite Farm.

As every year before the start of our summer distribution, we had CSA farmers Ted Blomgren from Windflower Farm and Alan Brown from Lewis Waite Farm come down to our distribution site, the M’Finda Kalunga Community Garden on the Lower East Side to greet new and returning members.

[We hope you’ll join us for the 2018 summer season. Our sign-up deadline is April 30th. Find out more and purchase a CSA share.]

While Alan explained how CSA members can order a la carte (which allows members to order delicious meats, dairy products, coffee beans, bread, maple syrup, and more throughout the season), Ted gave a great presentation on his farming philosophies, as well as the logistical details of how the CSA farm share works. He also gave us a forecast on what members can expect in their shares. You’ll get bi-color sweet corn, heirloom and red beefsteak tomatoes, colorful peppers, salad greens of every kind, cucumbers, carrots, red and yellow onions, broccoli, cabbage, potatoes, fresh green beans and much, much more.

Windflower Farm also offers optional shares of organically grown fresh-cut flowers, brown eggs from a neighbor’s pastured hens, and fresh fruits from their farm and throughout the Hudson Valley.

Sign up now!

We hope you’ll join us for the 2018 summer season. Our sign-up deadline is April 30th. Find out more and purchase a CSA share.

We are gearing up for the 2018 summer season, come and learn about community supported agriculture.

csa-vegetables-stock-01Community supported agriculture is an opportunity to join the local community and enjoy seasonal, farm fresh vegetables, eggs, flowers, fruit, meats and much more supplied by local, family-owned farms from June to November.

Join us and meet our CSA farmers. Ted Blomgren from Windflower Farm will talk about his farming philosophies, as well as the logistical details of how the CSA farm share works.

Also meet Alan and Nancy Brown from Lewis Waite Farm, who run our à la carte program which allows members to order meats, dairy products, coffee beans, bread, maple syrup, and more throughout the season.

Saturday, April 21, from 1:00 – 2:00 p.m. on the back patio of the M’Finda Kalunga Community Garden. Enter on Rivington between Forsyth & Christie (indoors if it’s cold/rainy)

Map